Chinese Steel Prices Ease as Demand Softens in Winter Season

Steel Prices

Normally when supply is constrained prices will rise, but China’s steel market is presently at the mercy of several dynamics.

On the one hand, Beijing is constraining polluting industries like steel and coke production. Those same policy decisions, however, are hitting industries that consume finished products, such as construction (at least in the industrial northeast, where environmental pollution action has been most active).

Arguably, steel prices would have fallen further as a result of the constraints put upon the construction industry if it were not for the the constraints put on steel production, which has restricted supply. What is difficult to gauge from official figures is quite how much impact restrictions due to environmental measures have caused and what, if any, impact of a relaxation of those restrictions will have.

Average Daily Steel Output Drops in December, Still Up 5.7% for 2017.

China’s average daily steel output fell by 1.9% in December to 2.16 million tons per day from 2.205 million the previous month. Even so, full year output in 2017 still rose 5.7% to 831.73 million tons.

In part, this is due to higher output earlier in the year boosting the annual number, but also because the National Bureau of Statistics has altered what it does and doesn’t include in its numbers. China closed an estimated 140 million tons of illegal induction furnace capacity in the first half of 2015, a sector that has not been included in production numbers because it is not approved.

The sector was significant though, and its loss during 2017 was a significant factor in the strength of rebar prices as conventional blast furnace producers ramped up rebar production and prices to take the place of lost output from these illegal induction furnace producers. Since then, Beijing has been encouraging state mills in the installation of modern electric arc furnaces (EAF), in large part because of their lower environmental impact. It is the growth of these EAF facilities that lifted production in the latter part of the year and contributed to a switch from pig iron to scrap as a raw material source.

Iron Ore Prices Show Volatility
Although China’s iron ore imports rose 5% in 2017, hitting a record of 1.075 billion tons, iron ore prices have show considerable volatility of late as speculators struggle to gauge what demand is going to be like once heating season restrictions are lifted.

Both iron ore and coking coal prices have been sliding in recent days, but the expectation is they will bounce back during the first quarter.

What happens after that remains to be seen.

With steel output restrictions lifted by late March, steel production will almost certainly increase, finished steel prices could weaken and steel mill margins could suffer. Q2 and beyond will depend on the strength of domestic demand, particularly from the construction sector.

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